Street Names

Harvey Street Names

Researched by Kerry Davis, 2016

Aachen Way: unknown

Abberton Way: In recognition of a soldier, Edmund Abberton, killed in WW1.

Anthony Street: In recognition of a soldier, Charles McPherson Anthony, killed in WW1.

Ash Avenue: Named after William Ash who was an early settler of the Korijekup Area, c.1895. William Ash came to the area as an Agricultural Advisor and was one of 16 men who were the founders of the Korijekup Fruit Settlement set up by Bede Christie.

Baker Street: A surveyor.

Becher Street: Frank Becher was an orchardist. He was also a prominent citizen of the town and served on a number of committees, often as president. He was the Chairman of the Harvey Road Board 1925 – 1930. See separate article – Francis Joseph Becher.

Boschetti Street: Giovanni Boschetti was the stonemason for the Shrine at the Internment Camp.

Buckby Road: Samuel Buckby became manager of the Harvey Estate c1890 under the partnership of Harvey & Hayward. Buckby was a respected member of the community and was elected to the Wellington Road Board in 1893.

Butcherbird Road: Named after a bird.

Candelora Place: unknown

Centennial Avenue: perhaps after the Centennial of WA in 1929.

Cooper Street: In recognition of a soldier, Charles Cooper, killed in WW1.

Davis Road: probably after EG Davis who wrote articles for the Harvey Waroona Mail in the 1950s. [See ‘History of Harvey and District’ on this website.] He was a Shire Councillor 1952–1969.

Depot Road: The road runs up to the Council Depot.

Eckersley Road: Walter Roy Eckersley was appointed irrigation engineer for the Department of Public Works in 1911. Roy Eckersley saw a succession of dams built on various rivers on the sites he had selected. The Harvey Weir was the first.

Field Road: In recognition of a soldier, Edward Richard Field, killed in WW1.

Fielder Street: Charlie Fielder, originally employed by Jacob Hawter in 1920, began his own nursery in Knowles Street before moving to Fryer Road, growing roses and fruit trees to supply Dawson’s Nursery in Perth. He extended his land holding to Herbert and Hocart Road, employing local men, including Italian immigrants. His four sons joined the business. When the Hocart Road holdings sold, he continued in Fryer Road.

Fourth Street: Streets are named numerically running north-south from Harvey towards Uduc.

Fryer Road: Robert Fryer settled in Harvey in 1908 and became manager of Hawter’s Nursery which supplied seedlings and grafted fruit trees to the orchardists. He also owned a general store on Uduc Road.

Funston Court: Funston was an early agriculturist.

Galvin Street: In recognition of a soldier, John Anthony Galvin, killed in WW2.

Gerschow Avenue: Otto Gerschow sub-divided his land into housing lots.

Gibbs Street: The Gibbs family connection with Harvey commenced with the arrival of Messrs Herbert William and George Gordon Gibbs who initially travelled with Dr Harvey and John Richard Young in the SS Hesperus bound for South Australia. They later formed the partnership of Harvey, Young & Gibbs under the brand name ‘Harvey Young & Gibbs’. One of their first ventures was the purchase of ‘Harvey River Station’ of 12,800 acres from Governor Stirling’s agents. The Gibbs brothers managed the property until 1887.

Greenfields Road: unknown

Grieves Street: John Grieves took up land in the district in 1902 just before marrying Charlotte Collins in 1903. He had diverse interests, working as a stock agent and butcher, maintaining the saleyards in Harper Street near the railway line and working his small farm south west of Harvey and an orchard on Seventh Street. He built an abattoir on Fryer Road and purchased Lot C2 on Uduc Road for his butcher shop.

Hackett Road: Hackett [probably Sir John Winthrop Hackett, a newspaper owner] had a financial interest in Harvey.

Harper Street: Harper [probably Charles Harper, a newspaper owner] had a financial interest in Harvey.

Harvey Street: Dr Henry Thomas Harvey formed the partnership of Harvey, Young & Gibbs under the brand name ‘HYG’. One of the first ventures was the purchase of ‘Harvey River Station’ of 12,800 acres from Governor Stirling’s agents.

Hayward Street: Originally called First Street, and renamed after Dr William Thornborough Hayward, who was a partner of Dr Harvey when Mr Young and the two Gibbs brothers – Herbert and George – withdrew from the partnership. The firm’s name was Harvey & Hayward and was the owner of the ‘Harvey River Station’.

Herbert Road: unknown

Hester Street: Reginald Hester was a Member and then Councillor of the Harvey Road Board 1946–1964 (In 1961 Harvey Road Board became Harvey Shire Council) and Chairman of the Harvey Road Board 1953–1961 and Shire President 1961-1964.

Hillside Road: probably named because it is on sloping ground.

Hinge Road: An early family of the district who had the service station on the South West Highway and then school buses.

Horizon Avenue: unknown

Ietto Way: John Ietto sub-divided his land into small farmlets.

Jacobs Drive: Dr Alfred Jacobs was a well-known general practitioner in Harvey and districts in the 1930s.

James Stirling Place: James Stirling chose 12,800 acres of land in the Harvey area for services rendered to the State of Western Australia as its first Governor.

Kealy Street: In recognition of a soldier, William John Kealy, killed in WW2.

Kennedy Street: Dr Kennedy was a general practitioner who had his practice on the corner of Sir James Avenue and Young Street.

Kidson Street: Kidson was a surveyor.

King Street: unknown

Knowles Street: John Knowles selected blocks 1, 2 and 9, totalling 119 acres which he called ‘Fairlawn’. After selling ‘Fairlawn’ to Henry Geoffrey Palmer (aka Major), John Knowles built a home and store called the ‘Busy Bee’ nearer the railway, on the corner of Uduc Road and Hackett Road. The store and house were demolished in the 1970s.

Korijekup Avenue: An Aboriginal name meaning place of the red-tailed cockatoo.

Larsen Court: Sister Larsen was a midwife in Harvey.

Lee Street: In recognition of a soldier, Walter Lee, killed in WW1.

Logue: Joseph Logue was the first European settler in the district of Yarloop/ Cookernup who arrived in 1849 and selected land on the banks of what became known as Logue Brook. His son Thompson Logue leased Stirling’s Korijekup Estate.

Lyons Way: Lyons was an early agriculturalist.

Minella Road: Jim Minella [Minnella] arrived in the district from Italy in the 1950s.

Morton Street: Probably named after Viv Morton who farmed at Mornington Mills.

Newell Street: Named after Thomas Newell who was an early settler of the Korijekup Area, c.1895. He was one of 16 men who were the founders of the Korijekup Fruit Settlement set up by Bede Christie.

Nursery Road: Named after Hawter’s Nursery, which occupied the land from Hayward Street to Young Street and from Roy Street to Gibbs Street.

Palmer Street: The two brothers, Henry (Harry) Geoffrey Palmer (aka Major) and his brother Charlie Seymour Palmer were initially attracted to subdivision Lot 23 of 154 acres, on Herbert Road. Henry Palmer purchased ‘Fairlawn’ in the early 1890s and renamed the property ‘Meriden’ after his birth place in Warwick, England. The land extended from the South West Highway on the south side of Uduc Road to the railway line. Palmer donated land for the Masonic Hall on Kidson Street.

Peet Street: Named after a land agent, James Thomas Peet of Peet & Co, Perth, WA.

Penny Lane: Perhaps after Eric Penny, a Shire Councillor in the 1990s who lived in Yarloop.

Preston Place: unknown

Pinner Street: Thomas Pinner established himself as a contractor and orchardist and had land west of the townsite.

Third Street: Streets are named numerically running north-south from Harvey towards Uduc.

Triller Road: Named after a bird.

Raneri Avenue: Giuseppe Raneri was the project designer for the Shrine at the Internment Camp.

Rath Court: Oscar Christian Jacob purchased land on Fifth Street (northern end) and became an orchardist in the Korijekup Area, c.1895. He was one of 16 men who were the founders of the Korijekup Fruit Settlement set up by Bede Christie. Rath owned shops on Hayward Street and business ventures in the town.

Roy Street: Named after Roy Hayward, son of Dr William Thornborough Hayward. The Hayward family had property west of the railway line on Roy Street, called ‘Riverton’.

Sir James Avenue: In recognition of the work of the Premier, Sir James Mitchell.

Sittella Drive: Named after a bird.

Songlark Drive: Named after a bird.

Stanford Court: Alf Stanford was an early orchardist in the Harvey area c1900.

Sutton Street: William J Sutton served as a councillor for the Harvey Road Board 1910 – 1913. William Sutton owned ‘Jardup’.

Tamba Way: Gaetano Tomba was the construction assistant for the Shrine at the Internment Camp.

Tom Latch Drive: Tom Latch worked at Hawter’s Nursery and also operated the Boarding House on the corner of Hayward and Gibbs Streets.

Topham Place: Dr Peter Topham was a well-respected general practitioner in Harvey.

Uduc Road: It is believed that the native name for the area was ‘Udicup’ but Maurice Brett Smith, the first settler in the area abbreviated it to Uduc.

Weir Road: The road runs towards the weir from Harvey townsite.

Westwind Court: unknown

Whistler Way: Named after a bird.

Woodward Street: Named after Bernard Woodward who was an early settler of the Korijekup Area, c1895. He was one of 16 men who were the founders of the Korijekup Fruit Settlement set up by Bede Christie.

Wright Street: A surveyor.

Young Street: Originally called Second Street, then renamed after one of the pioneers of Harvey. Young formed the partnership of Harvey, Young & Gibbs under the brand name ‘HYG’. One of their first ventures was the purchase of ‘Harvey River Station’ of 12,800 acres from Governor Stirling’s agents.

Sources:

  • They Made Their Destiny by AC Staples
  • Municipal Inventory Review, Hocking Heritage Studio
  • Heritage Within The Harvey Shire
  • Shire of Harvey, Proud to be 100, Centennial Book
  • Ancestry.com – Electoral Rolls

If you can help fill the blanks, please email info@harveyhistoryonline.com